Artists at Dekkle A range of the artwork from the artists at Dekkle Our Aubert Intaglio Press in motion lino cut and roller Our Aubert Intaglio Press A woodcut design being inked up A member of Dekkle working on the press Some of our pigment being mixed An etching by Hideki Arichi Our Aubert Intaglio Press

Artists & publications

For more information about our artists and their artwork please do not hesitate to contact the studio, if you would like to view the work you can also arrange a time at your convenience at the studio.

‘Embracing the Surplus and the Unwanted’ by Mary Dalton

Embracing the Surplus and the Unwanted by Mary Dalton Embracing the Surplus and the Unwanted by Mary Dalton Embracing the Surplus and the Unwanted by Mary Dalton Embracing the Surplus and the Unwanted by Mary Dalton Embracing the Surplus and the Unwanted by Mary Dalton Embracing the Surplus and the Unwanted by Mary Dalton

This hand-printed book contains enticing recipes to celebrate and learn from those who are resourceful with surplus and unwanted food, from wild jam making to mushroom foraging.

The illustrations embody the emotions that these recipes and stories contain, celebrating the joy that cooking and harvesting food can give to all.

This is currently being printed and is available at a pre-order price of £120.00.

David Borrington MA RCA

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My work is a direct response to current social and world affairs that aims to support the growth of true democracy. I do this by exposing flaws in the crumbling western democratic model which is rapidly lurching towards a fascist world order.

When you look at my drawings please try to read them like a book from left to right. They are full of symbolism, such as flags, logos and iconic buildings. When you look at several of my works together you can see that they are peppered with similar codes, even though they may be depicting a completely different event in a different location. It is important to understand the location of the subject I am dealing with too and the thread that runs through it all is that all political events happen for a reason.

The Latin term 'Cui Bono' has become a sort of philosophy to me that guides my research. This approach may also help you look at world events more critically, too. Translated, it means 'who benefits?' Simply put, do not believe anybody, look at the evidence from all angles and be open minded and flexible when forming your opinions.

Mary Dalton MA RCA

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My work grows through the process of making. The direct interaction with the materials I use, their character and emotions, guides the idea that I then attach to the piece: the material precedes the concept. The choice of substances comes predominately from a domestic setting: dark wood from an elderly friend’s house, homemade vegetable dyes, and doilies.

As with the works that inspire me by Eva Hesse and Joseph Beuys, from the numerous piles of stuff that I produce, I select and display those that communicate to the viewer the pleasure and passion found in the process of creation

Olenna Mokliak MA RCA

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The place from which I make work is a land where possibilities are infinite. This is an imaginary world, one of hyper-reality, a location where absurdity is a source of freedom. I strive to connect with a residual energy and work to explore the images of my subconscious. Writing poetry and prose is an extension of this make-believe microcosm.

"Now. Walking along a concrete-covered path where train tracks rested, the route through an intangible no-man’s-land of disintegrating history. Ghosts of engines howl. The intonation of this sound performs – a dancing spectre. In the black room where life once resided. Home. Borderless. This is my liminal wilderness.

Hideki Arichi MA

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I continue to pursue mainly printmaking as the focus of my practice, which is concerned with shape and form as well as the formal aspects of scale, proportion and placement. I am also interested in process and working with different materials, I use both intaglio and relief printing methods depending upon the image. Underlying the work is an interest in both Western and Eastern aesthetics that leads to mainly abstract conclusions. The final outcomes are often abstract allowing for the viewer to bring their own experiences in interpreting the work.

I recently completed a MA in Fine Art & Applied Art and have worked in the film industry on numerous features.

My first degree was in History of Art and I am knowledgeable primarily on 20th Century art.

Dance of Lights - Hideki Arichi Disappearance - Hideki Arichi Good-Day- - Hideki Arichi Nights-in-Reykjavik - Hideki Arichi Silence - Hideki Arichi Till-next-time - Hideki Arichi

"Það er erfitt að segja" / it is hard to say...

In February 2011, I stayed in an artists’ residency in Iceland. What made a big impression on me was the changing light around me during the short days. These sudden flashes of colour could last mere moments before a complete and utter change. I was also lucky enough to see the Northern Lights one evening while in the city. The colours may not be naturalistic but I believe that I strike a balance between giving an impression and capturing a certain attitude that I experienced during my stay.

Conversations with Icelandic artists who talked about finding light in their work also influenced the process. What I discovered in Iceland was a very positive experience from my surroundings and in the attitude of the people that led to this series. The titles were provided and suggested by an Icelandic friend.

Aithan Shapira PhD

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"Man I love not. I love that which devours him."
—Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Night Flight

As a first generation American—my family is rooted 10 generation in Jerusalem—I have watched my mother failing to replant her childhood (Cfar Saba, Israel) garden for nearly thirty years in the rejecting soil and climate of our temporary home? 40 km west of New York City.

We complete nature with feeling; otherwise, autumn would only be dying leaves. Behind the open curtain in my work, an altar of symbols of survival and preservation converse in syllogistic reasoning—the nude reality of our profound act of life.

My father, an Israeli immigrant, ran a factory where he cut the fabric for women's coats. I frequented that factory for over 25 years. Today, I build off of the shapes created in and between the patterns of his blueprints, drawing, often by scissoring, with typical tools of his trade

Eleanor Havsteen-Franklin MA

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My etchings form a dialogue between intentional linear drawing and concepts of randomness. The philosophy of George Bataille (1896-1966) has influenced my approach to printmaking in that he emphasised the significance of modern society overlooking the social and psychological diversity of human experience; particularly the discarded and random aspects. In the etchings this concern takes its form in drawing both with traditional etching tools and found discarded objects, and in an engagement with the uncertain. During the etching process foul biting is encouraged on the copper plates creating a relationship between the drawn lines and marks with unpredictable tones and gestures. The notion being that the printmaking process ties in with the subject matter of exposing and highlighting that which may seem insignificant and random. The lines become heavily etched and the surface of the print textured, emulating the physicality of skin. At times this is investigated further with the use of stitching and sewing into the print creating a more complex texture. The exploration of organic and bodily forms remains a central theme in my work where one is often echoed in the other and the intensity of the colour hues are associated with the subject matter. Etching, with its possibility of multiple prints, gives me the opportunity to use colours to explore and create resonance between associations and polarities to the subject as well as a continuous engagement with mark making and ‘the surface’.